Martyrdom of Ya’akov HaTsadeek #75

James the Just, brother of Messiah, suffered martyrdom about the year 63 CE. According to Josephus, the first century Jewish historian, it was widely believed that the destruction of Jerusalem occurred because of the murder of James the Just! In fact, it is claimed in the historical documents that the murder of James the Just was foretold by the prophet Isaiah and was fulfilled in the demise of the Jewish system in 70 CE at the hands of the Romans. It is remarkable that it was not only Messianic Jews that believed this regarding James the Just. Rather, this belief was widely held generally by all Jews of that era. What was so unique about the martyrdom of Ya’akov HaTsadeek a/k/a James the Just that the Jews would believe the destruction of their Temple, Holy City, and entire Jewish system was due to their treatment of James? In this episode we will consider the historical report of the martyrdom of James the Just. As we consider this report you will be amazed, you will be informed and you will be inspired by the story of this remarkable man of God. His story has a lot more to do with your life today than you could possibly imagine. You need to hear this program!

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Clement on Ya’akov HaTsadeek #73

Wanna know someone? ..Read their mail! In this program we will open the mail of James the Just. “The Epistle of Clement to James” is only one of a number of Clementine letters that illuminates the role of James the Just among the early believers. Clement, who eventually became bishop of Rome, is reported to have been a disciple of Peter in the first century. In fact, the Roman Church calls Clement “Pope” in succession from Peter. In fact, Clement may be named by Paul in the “New Testament” Epistle to the Philippians 4:3. In the above named epistle of Clement he wrote to James the Just to report his ordination into office by Peter. This and other Clementine epistles gives us a view into the internal government of the early believers that many find quite surprising. In the salutation of Clement to James he calls James “bishop of bishops” and also repeatedly calls James “my lord” – and that is only the start of the surprises! Clearly, Clement reveals a mindset regarding James that is not familiar to believers today. You will likely be astounded by this historical look into the working government of the early believers – particularly as it pertains to James the Just. In the process you will learn how you have been robbed by the Roman Church!

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