Post-Messiah Davidic Dynasty #76

Davidic aspirations ran high among the Jews of the first century, fueling a parade of Davidic contenders for the messianic throne. This misplaced messianic fervor proved to be a catalyst to rebellion and insurrection against the Roman super-state, bringing on harsh reprisals and the eventual destruction of Jerusalem and its Temple in 70 CE. Some of the Davidic players commented on in this program include Menahem, the grandson of Judas the Galilean, John of Gischala, and Simon bar Gjora. In fact, you will learn that there was a Davidic king on the Throne in Jerusalem at the time of its destruction! You will be amazed to hear what happened to him and his administration following the Roman victory. You will also learn that a Davidic dynasty of Y’shua’s family continued among the early believers into at least the fourth century, at which time they were driven underground after a final and fateful meeting with Pope Sylvester of the Roman Church. Some desposynos discussed in this program include Symeon son of Joseph’s brother Clopas, Yeshua’s cousin and the successor to James the Just after his martyrdom; also the grandsons of Jude, the Lord’s brother; Thebouthis, a Davidic rival to Symeon who introduced heresies among the believers; also comments on the whole line of desposyni including such names as Zachary, Joseph, John, James, Joses, Simeon, and Matthias – all the way down to the fateful meeting of a delegation of Nazareans headed by a member of the Lord’s family named Joses with Pope Sylvester in 318 CE. This program contains a lot of vital “Church History” that definitely is NOT the same ol’ story you heard in Sunday School!

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Clement on Ya’akov HaTsadeek #73

Wanna know someone? ..Read their mail! In this program we will open the mail of James the Just. “The Epistle of Clement to James” is only one of a number of Clementine letters that illuminates the role of James the Just among the early believers. Clement, who eventually became bishop of Rome, is reported to have been a disciple of Peter in the first century. In fact, the Roman Church calls Clement “Pope” in succession from Peter. In fact, Clement may be named by Paul in the “New Testament” Epistle to the Philippians 4:3. In the above named epistle of Clement he wrote to James the Just to report his ordination into office by Peter. This and other Clementine epistles gives us a view into the internal government of the early believers that many find quite surprising. In the salutation of Clement to James he calls James “bishop of bishops” and also repeatedly calls James “my lord” – and that is only the start of the surprises! Clearly, Clement reveals a mindset regarding James that is not familiar to believers today. You will likely be astounded by this historical look into the working government of the early believers – particularly as it pertains to James the Just. In the process you will learn how you have been robbed by the Roman Church!

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